On-site Wastewater Disposal Systems Bylaw

Feedback period closes 11:59pm, Friday 15 October.

Engineer on site.jpg

We are seeking feedback on our proposed On-site Wastewater Disposal Systems Bylaw that regulates the maintenance of on-site wastewater disposal systems. This is necessary to prevent harm to public health and nuisance.

You can read the proposed On-site Wastewater Disposal Systems Bylaw(PDF, 227KB) here. 

Share your feedback on the proposed Bylaw

There are no proposed changes from the existing Bylaw regarding on-site wastewater for residential properties. The language has been improved to make the bylaw more clear. 

 

Questions & answers

The purpose of the bylaw is to protect public health and prevent nuisance by specifying requirements for the maintenance of on-site wastewater disposal systems.

During 2002-2003, Council conducted on-site effluent surveys and identified that 90% of effluent discharge found in stormwater samples was due to the lack of maintenance of on-site wastewater disposal systems (septic tanks). The On-site Wastewater Bylaw was made to regulate the maintenance of on-site wastewater disposal systems to protect the environment and public health.

There has been a significant reduction in failed systems since the introduction of the Bylaw. The number of annual ‘requests to rectify’ have decreased from nearly 200 in 2008 and 2009 to zero in 2019 and 2020.

Any property owner in the Far North who uses an on-site wastewater disposal system.

The new bylaw doesn't really change existing regulation, but it looks a bit different. Some clauses have been removed that duplicate what is already covered in the District Plan and Building Act 2004.

One of the changes is that the current bylaw requires commercial and industrial properties to have an individual maintenance agreement. However, most of these agreements are for three years. The new proposed bylaw aims to clarify the regulation of on-site wastewater disposal systems on commercial and industrial properties by setting clear standards based on current practice. This will remove the need for most commercial and industrial properties to have individual agreements.

No. The current bylaw and the proposed new bylaw only require an assessment every five years. An outcome of the assessment might be a requirement to clean the tank or it could be to re-assess in two or three years for example. This allows for flexibility between households - a large family's septic tank will likely require more regular maintenance than the septic tank of a person who is living alone.

  1. Geoffrey Marchant
    All sounds good to me
    1. Briar Corbett
      Moderator
      Thanks for your feedback Geoffrey!
  2. Danny Liufalani
    Have discussed this issue with local residence in the Northern region,and has requested our visit to the region and share system that able to treat septic waste at source and recover solids as biosolids for soil implementation or further use on waste to energy power plant if the technology can be funded in the Northland. Cleaning septic waste is simple,and water reuse on other things. The system has endorsed by Watercare in Auckland. Contact me for more information should you wish.