RAPID numbers

1. Overview

What is RAPID numbering?

RAPID stands for Rural Address Property IDentification. It gives every rural residential property a road number, just like urban streets have. It can be hard to explain exactly where you live on long rural roads. RAPID is necessary for emergency services such as police, fire, ambulance and civil defence and also service providers such as NZ Post, Telecom, couriers and power authorities.  Most of the rural areas in NZ are now RAPID numbered and the system has been very successful in assisting in fast location of rural properties. 

Common questions and answers

 

How do I know if I need a RAPID number or an urban number?

One way we determine this is if the speed limit for your road is 50km, it is likely to be an urban numbering area.  You can contact us directly for a street number if you don't have one. 

60k or higher speed limits on roads indicate a rural area - apply for a RAPID plate online.  If you are unsure, use the link above to get in touch with us. 

Otherwise a distinctive blue and white number plate at the entrance of your property will indicate your property your property has a RAPID number.  

What is the difference between a new plate and a replacement?

NEW - Vacant sections without a vehicle crossing or access into the property are unlikely to have a RAPID number allocated.  Once a new driveway has been added we are able to measure and allocate your RAPID number. 

REPLACEMENT - Select this option if you already know an of an existing RAPID number and need your plate replaced for any reason.  

What happens after the RAPID number is allocated?

The RAPID number is geo-located and recorded on council's GIS (Geographic Information System).  NZ Post, Quotable Valuation NZ and Land Information New Zealand are all advised.  Other private organisations (Google, Homes.co.nz etc) are updated through their own sources and in their own time.

As with all street numbering, it is important that the correct street numbers are displayed for emergency services to locate you quickly and efficiently.  

 

Can I have another plate for my stockyard or packing shed?

We can allocate a number to any residence or utility building with an accessway.  If you are unsure whether you can order one, you can email the team for clarification.

 

What do they look like and where are they placed?

They have reflective blue numbers for ease of visibility and the FNDC logo to distinguish them from other plates (eg. dairy company plates).
Your RAPID plate should be attached in a prominent position close to your vehicle entrance, which could be on a letterbox, gatepost or wooden fence. Plates are to be fixed parallel to the road. 

 

  

3. More about RAPID numbering 

Where can I search on council maps to check RAPID numbering on my property? 

Click here and select Aerial Imagery

1. Enter one of the following into the search bar; Road name; Valuation number; Title number; Parcel (Lot & DP number) and click on the magnifying glass to search.

A result window will pop up when you click on your property. 

2. If the property has a street number it will show here.  If it says a lot number instead such as - Lot 2,  Smith Road - there is no RAPID number allocated.  

If you wish to print the map, click the icon at the top right hand corner of the page.  You can use this map as part of your application. 

How are RAPID numbers allocated?

Your RAPID number will be based on the distance your property is from the beginning of the road on which it is located. The numbers are allocated to properties by measuring, in metres, the distance from the commencement of the road to the centre of the dwelling's driveway. The final measurement is divided by 10, and then rounded to a whole number. Numbers on the right of the road are even; those on the left are odd. For example a property located 825 meters from the commencement of the road would be numbered 82 if on the right side of the road or 83 if on the left side of the road. If there is more than one dwelling off a driveway then a letter e.g. A, B, or C is appended. The first house along will be A, the second B, etc. It is the owner's decision whether they want to put up their own number on the house itself. There are particular protocols for long roads, such as state highways, and where long roads continue through townships.

State Highways

The maximum length of RAPID numbering is 100km, then the numbering starts again. For this reason it is important that the locality of the property accompany the RAPID number e.g. No 2345 SH1, Ohaeawai.

SH1 has 3 sections:

  • Whangarei to Ohaeawai
  • Ohaeawai to Kaitaia (Ohaeawai is the junction of SH1 & SH12)
  • Kaitaia to as far as the road SH.1 goes.

SH10 has 2 sections as it just over 100km:

  • SH1 (Pakaraka) to Kaeo
  • Kaeo to SH1 (Awanui)

SH12 has 2 sections:

  • Dargaville to Opononi
  • Opononi to SH1 at Ohaeawai

Townships

Where a township has no existing numbers the RAPID numbers are continuous through the township. If urban numbers exist the RAPID stops at the commencement of the urban numbers, and starts again where urban numbers end. However the distance measurements continue through the town e.g. Kawakawa (SH1) has urban numbers, so the RAPID stops at 5349 and starts again at 5630.

However if the town is the point of commencement for a new section (ie, its getting close to 100 kms) then the RAPID ends at the commencement of urban numbering and starts a new series where urban numbering ends. Every attempt is made to avoid overlaps in the numbers in the urban/RAPID changeover. However, there may be some sorting out required where people have 'adopted' a number for themselves. Often an urban part of the SH network has its own name which helps.

How will RAPID affect my address?

The RAPID number should be added to the usual RD address e.g. 963 *road name*, RD3 *town*

 

 

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